1000 Heads

Helping brands’ stories travel further and faster
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Posts Tagged ‘digital marketing’

Nokia's commitment to conversation

Thursday, March 4th, 2010

Nokia is our longest standing client. The Nokia team are a pleasure to work with for many reasons, not least because they’re curious. They really think around and strive to understand the social and word of mouth space themselves, they blog about it, they attend its key events. This is so great because it means we don’t have a traditional agency and brand we-tell-you, you-tell-us relationship;

we have a conversation.

A nice example of this is the deck Nokia Head of Digital Arto Joensuu has just popped up on Slideshare; they created it last year but the thinking and articulation are still spot on.

It’s also worth checking out the conversation on Senior Marketing Manager Dan Goodall‘s blog. His latest post on The Goodwill Hunters is particularly worth a read (and make sure to mine his links for some excellent further insights).

At Like Minds 2010 last weekend Dan and I also discussed the PESH model he created with Arto back in July as ‘a way of mapping out the different roles that brands need to fulfill from a digital marketing perspective.’

I really like it, although I agree with Arto that it works for a wider social context beyond digital, and I’d like to make a few tweaks myself.

First of all, you need Listening in there – right at the centre – as this drives the ways in which brands can add value to consumers. And I’d prioritise Help and Enable over Participate and Sell. Lots of brands are jumping into the social space to do a bit of Participation here and push a few Sales there – but unless they are either Helping or Enabling, they don’t earn the right to do either.

In which case PESH becomes HELPS, and looks something like this:

What do you think?

It’s great to be able to refine your own thinking with rather than despite a client. This is surely the way that companies and agencies must work going forwards to really benefit consumers.

Heads together, not worlds apart.

Nokia’s commitment to conversation

Thursday, March 4th, 2010

Nokia is our longest standing client. The Nokia team are a pleasure to work with for many reasons, not least because they’re curious. They really think around and strive to understand the social and word of mouth space themselves, they blog about it, they attend its key events. This is so great because it means we don’t have a traditional agency and brand we-tell-you, you-tell-us relationship;

we have a conversation.

A nice example of this is the deck Nokia Head of Digital Arto Joensuu has just popped up on Slideshare; they created it last year but the thinking and articulation are still spot on.

It’s also worth checking out the conversation on Senior Marketing Manager Dan Goodall‘s blog. His latest post on The Goodwill Hunters is particularly worth a read (and make sure to mine his links for some excellent further insights).

At Like Minds 2010 last weekend Dan and I also discussed the PESH model he created with Arto back in July as ‘a way of mapping out the different roles that brands need to fulfill from a digital marketing perspective.’

I really like it, although I agree with Arto that it works for a wider social context beyond digital, and I’d like to make a few tweaks myself.

First of all, you need Listening in there – right at the centre – as this drives the ways in which brands can add value to consumers. And I’d prioritise Help and Enable over Participate and Sell. Lots of brands are jumping into the social space to do a bit of Participation here and push a few Sales there – but unless they are either Helping or Enabling, they don’t earn the right to do either.

In which case PESH becomes HELPS, and looks something like this:

What do you think?

It’s great to be able to refine your own thinking with rather than despite a client. This is surely the way that companies and agencies must work going forwards to really benefit consumers.

Heads together, not worlds apart.

Advertisers are still misunderstanding social media

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

Andrew Harrison’s piece in Marketing Week last Wednesday got me, well, a little riled. Challenging “the whirl of advertiser excitement about all things digital”, he believes that “the online social networking emperor has no clothes” as it is an “inappropriate” advertising medium that fails on “delivery of audience and generation of revenue”. Read the whole article here.

Harrison’s view of social media as an advertising medium starts from a basic misunderstanding of how people are acting in this space. His commentary is correct in asserting that social networking does not fit into the model of traditional advertising, that online ads are virtually redundant, that reach and revenue have been sidelined, and that social media is no more appropriate an advertising medium than a pub or café. It’s exactly because advertising – as Andrew understands it – does not fit into our new social platforms that the opportunities are so great. Businesses are being forced to approach consumers in a newly collaborative way which is much more valuable to both them and their cusutomers than the methods that Andrew quite rightly says do not work anymore online.

Social networks represent a massive paradigm shift in how we interact with brands, our relocation of trust in brands from radio, TV, print and banner ads to peer to peer word of mouth – and there is plenty of research to prove it. Just generating revenue and proving eyeballs to content is no longer enough. With consumer trust in brands so compromised, media savvy and recession-wounded people look to each other to decide where to put their money, but also their emotional investment and loyalty. The brands that recognize they need to listen to, learn from, and inspire the independent, passionate conversations between their consumers are the ones that will survive and flourish – not the ones who retreat because their old methods won’t work.

The landscape, mentality and behaviour of consumers has irrevocably changed, however many lookalike 2.0 startups crumble under the strain. The issue is not that social networking is the emperor in new clothes; the problem is that advertising emperors are trying to squeeze themselves into social media’s garments when they just won’t fit.